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The Maillard Reaction
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2016/08/03 07:14:17 (permalink)

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post edited by Caa2 - 2016/11/25 10:15:38
#1
ston
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Re: NAS ready drives; What makes NAS ready bare drives different from the other bare drive 2016/08/03 08:19:03 (permalink)
I think it's mostly marketing bollocks.  Note that many 'NAS Drives' are 5400rpm, not 7200.  This is very possibly a factor in the only relevant difference I can find between the drives which is their warranty period.
 
Some of the more funky 'NAS Drives' pack in more platters which require the drive to be hermetically sealed as they contain helium, which makes the drive talk in a squeaky high-pitched voice.  Well, not really, but it does make the drive bloody expensive.
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pwalpwal
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Re: NAS ready drives; What makes NAS ready bare drives different from the other bare drive 2016/08/03 08:30:46 (permalink)
marketing bollocks +1

just a sec

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DrLumen
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Re: NAS ready drives; What makes NAS ready bare drives different from the other bare drive 2016/08/03 12:31:23 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby un 2016/08/03 14:14:08
FWIW, all drives are sealed. Not sure about helium (I would have guessed nitrogen) filled but they are air tight. They can't allow the smallest spec of dust inside due to the way the heads float above the platters.
 
But to the original point... there may be firmware tweaks to optimize use in RAID's. Seems like I read that they tend to spin down more often to try to save energy.

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tlw
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Re: NAS ready drives; What makes NAS ready bare drives different from the other bare drive 2016/08/03 12:53:17 (permalink) ☼ Best Answerby un 2016/08/03 14:13:43
This comparison may be of interest.

http://www.storagereview....s_hdds_vs_desktop_hdds

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The Maillard Reaction
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. 2016/08/03 13:55:49 (permalink)
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post edited by Caa2 - 2016/11/25 10:15:47
#6
bapu
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Re: NAS ready drives; What makes NAS ready bare drives different from the other bare drive 2016/08/03 15:51:36 (permalink)
McQ gets edjumacated.
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DrLumen
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Re: NAS ready drives; What makes NAS ready bare drives different from the other bare drive 2016/08/03 16:14:22 (permalink)
After doing some more reading I stand corrected... Hermetically sealed and helium are the new(er) fad. May be time to buy into some type of helium futures.

-When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro.

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bitflipper
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Re: NAS ready drives; What makes NAS ready bare drives different from the other bare drive 2016/08/03 18:58:15 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby AllanH 2016/08/21 13:09:18
Conventional drives have to be pressurized, so that the heads float above the platter. Traditionally, that's meant sucking air into the unit through a fine filter. Said filters can get clogged, reducing air pressure and causing the head to crash into the platter. They also allow some particles through, theoretically nothing large enough to do damage, but over time you can get junk floating around in there. A sealed drive filled with an inert gas eliminates that problem, at least until the gas leaks out. Then it crashes. 
 
Back in the day, cleaning and replacing hard drive air filters was part of my job. But with the advent of cheap drives the presumption was that the drives will become obsolete in a couple years' time anyway, and they stopped making the filters replaceable. And in fact modern drives are far more dependable than the $80,000 units I used to work on. Still, if you have a critical application that can't tolerate drive failure, you've got to figure out how to keep them clean and low-humidity for long-term reliability. And who worries about such things nowadays? Nobody.
 
Because there's no dust to worry about, platters in helium-filled drives need less platter-to-head clearance and can therefore be placed closer together, allowing for greater capacity. Does that make it worth spending 5x as much for a disk drive? In a laptop, yes, I think it might. In a desktop in a clean studio, nah. 
 
Back to topic...when they say "NAS-ready" what they're really saying is they're high-availability. It means they've got shock/vibration absorption. It means they're intended to be operated 24x7. Some are hot-swappable, which is essential for always-up server RAID arrays. These considerations are a big deal for, say, an online retailer or a 911 dispatch center, but not to a DAW user.


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#9
slartabartfast
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Re: NAS ready drives; What makes NAS ready bare drives different from the other bare drive 2016/08/04 08:01:48 (permalink)
The firmware differences have bee alluded to previously. There may be differences among manufacturers, but  one issue is the number of re-reads of poor signals.  A desktop system is generally assumed to have a single drive, so if a read fails it is usually tried several times, which may result in a successful read but requires more time. Most of the drives intended for mass storage on servers or NAS are designed to be used in fault tolerant arrays. Under those conditions, it is often faster to fail the read, and get the data from a mirror or a parity drive than to do multiple re-reads. So if a drive with limited re-reads is used by itself, there may be more failed reads that will stop the system, since there is no alternate source for the data. Incidentally, many of the big data centers do not use drives that are constructed for more reliable operation (often called "enterprise" drives) because the cost is not worth the benefit. It is cheaper to replace standard drives when they fail than to try to run thousands of heavy duty drives. 
#10
ston
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Re: NAS ready drives; What makes NAS ready bare drives different from the other bare drive 2016/08/04 09:10:58 (permalink)
FYI, the recycling filter(s) in the drive are there to catch particles coming off the drive platter, not to catch dust particles coming into the drive (as the drive is sealed).  That's my understanding anyway.
 
Checkout "The Engineer Guy"'s video on it. He's pretty cool:
 
http://www.engineerguy.co...os/video-harddrive.htm
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AllanH
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Re: NAS ready drives; What makes NAS ready bare drives different from the other bare drive 2016/08/21 12:54:00 (permalink)
thanks to bitflipper for the details, including the high availability feature. For consumer drives, I've actually seen the description being almost "the opposite". Here a NAS drive is intended for one of the consumer NAS devices where the main feature is power save, and ability to get in and out of sleep relatively quickly as the expectation is that the NAS device is for off-line storage and thus not used often. Fascinating!

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#12
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