Helpful ReplyPreparing a Client Mix

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DJ Darkside
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2017/02/25 11:25:26 (permalink)

Preparing a Client Mix

Looking for a bit of advice / insight into how other prepare mixes they get from clients?
 
I get audio files sent to me and some are appalling and some are good. But as we all know, as a service we offer we have to deal with whatever hits us. I would like to see what steps other engineers take to prepare the types of audio files after importing them into Sonar?
 
Some Questions
  • Sonar has a Trim Knob at the top of every channel, is this something any of you use to balance out the audio before you start mixing?
  • there are times I notice my plugins are clipping (or the light indicator on the clipping flashes yellow) How do you deal with this?
  • Do you bring down your volume faders for each channel before you start mixing?
  • What level to you start mixing at on the Master Bus?
  • Do you use normalisation at all during this process?
  • What exactly is gain staging? I was under the impression, gain staging is when you use the Trim Knob at the top of each channel to balance out the audio so it all peaks at the same level before moving onto mixing. Is this correct?
I am looking for the best workflow for importing and setting up a mix to ensure I am not overdriving my channels, plugins and Master Bus.
 
Please share your process and ideas with me, it would be greatly appreciated.
 
I have had a few songs submitted to me the past few days and it made me think. I want to deliver the best service as a mix engineer that I can but I am unsure as to how to deal with this scenario?
 
I usually record my own stuff, so I am in more control with the audio. When someone else submits things to me, I have to take what I can get. After all, turning away a mix is a way of turning away money. Sometimes I am forced to tell a client to re-record something, that is understandable, but I will like to get a better idea of how other take this into account and prepare their mixes?

Mark Liebrand
DJ Darkside 2001-20xx 
www.djdarkside.com
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dwardzala
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Re: Preparing a Client Mix 2017/02/25 12:05:08 (permalink)
Without answering your questions directly, I will give you my workflow and I think it will address them.
 
I start out with project template which is set up for mixing.  It has a number of busses that I expect to use already set up with the appropriate PC modules and FX in them.
 
I import the audio and list to each track solo'd so I can identify what it is and rename it something that makes sense.  I also route the tracks to the appropriate busses and create aux tracks at this point (e.g. to route a top and bottom snare to one fader).  I use the gain/trim knob at the top to bring each track's highest level down to -16.  I usually do this by using the max value at the bottom of the fader strip to determine how much I need to bring stuff down.  I leave the mix bus and master bus at unity.  My master bus meter is usually peaking at -6 at this point.
 
I then spend 20 minutes or less setting panning and rough levels.  I will usually apply light compression and a little bit of EQ on the mix bus at this point.  After that I will edit the vocals pitch and amplitude using Melodyne.
 
I then set the master bus to mono and start using compression and EQ to unmask each instrument and get it to sit in the mix.
 
After I have satisfactorily eq'd and compressed the tracks, I go back into stereo and begin apply effects like reverb and delay.  Then I work on automation to create tension and feature different parts in the arrangement.
 
Gain staging is probably better explained by some of the real experts here, but as I understand it is managing the gain/levels throughout the entire signal chain so that the correct amount of signal hits each part of the signal chain to deliver the appropriate effect.
 
Hope this helps.

Dave
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#2
DJ Darkside
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Re: Preparing a Client Mix 2017/02/25 12:10:09 (permalink)
Dave,
 
That is great. Nice feedback. Gives me an idea that I am on the right track with what I do. So, you trim the tracks that much? I always feel like I am degrading the audio by bringing down the levels so much with trim and then using compression, etc... to slowly bring levels mildly back up before I use a mastering plugin at the end.
 
Just want to get a better idea of how everyone is doing things, especially some of the experts.
 
Thanks for your speedy feedback.

Mark Liebrand
DJ Darkside 2001-20xx 
www.djdarkside.com
-------------------------------------------------------
Running: Windows 10 64 bit, Sonar Platinum, Ableton Live, Novation Impulse, Native Instruments Maschine, a few mics, 1963 Fender Strat, a Fender Jazz Bass and some secret weapons... EQ and Compression.
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greg_moreira
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Re: Preparing a Client Mix 2017/02/25 17:07:55 (permalink)
I normalize every track to -1 to start with and I cant think of a time where Ive touched the gain/trim adjustment.
 
some tracks are going to be audibly louder than others at -1(as a starting point) just depending on whether or not the source material has some pretty big transient peaks or if its a pretty solid wave.  I dont worry about that too much.  that will be dealt with using the faders and compression/limiting over the life of the mix.
 
next thing is I always start with a channel strip with eq and compression, and console emulation on every track.
 
I'll use a modest 2:1 or less compression with a slow attack(20-30 ms) and modest release on every track and pull the threshold til I see 2-3 db of gain reduction.  Then I use makeup gain in the plug in to bring the volume back to where it was.  I try to avoid changing the perceived volume of the track with the plugin.  So in other words....  when I cycle the plugin on and off...you notice no volume difference.  Just the effect.  this is on the individual tracks.  This holds true with every track.  If I go crazy with 10 plugins on a single track...  it doesnt get consecutively louder with each plugin.  I dial the input or output volume or makeup gain or whatever in order to retain the source volume.  I can bypass the FX bin and, killing all plugins and the audible level will stay the same to your ear but the effects will go away.
 
If any plugins are peaking I either dial down the input or output in the plugin.  Again I dont mess with track gain.  I just do it within the plugin.
 
I will add some drive from the console emulation too, but pull back the volume within the plugin to make sure it only adds drive and not volume.
 
I buss everything to various busses and use the same style of compression described above and often a master buss eq for each bus just in case some overall shaping to a group of instruments needs to happen.
 
Then I mix and pan and automate and play with individual channel EQ all that fun stuff.
 
Once the balance of the mix is where I want it I check the master buss meter.  I want to be around -4 pre master.
 
if the mix is too loud I use the individual track faders to adjust, and by selecting all tracks and holding ctrl, I drag down every fader the exact same amount all at the same time to lower overall volume and maintain balance.
 
if its too quiet I do just the opposite and push everything up simultaneously til I see -4 on the fader.
 
At that point Id walk around the room and listen to the mix better.  Id do a mono test and a few other last minute checks.
 
If I like what I hear, I bounce it out and bring it into a new session to master.
 
 
 
 
#4
DJ Darkside
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Re: Preparing a Client Mix 2017/02/26 04:00:15 (permalink)
greg_moreira
I normalize every track to -1 to start with and I can't think of a time where I've touched the gain/trim adjustment.

 
I have read before that, normalizing your audio is a no go? Just want to see what your response to that is? And maybe other people's responses to that?
 
Some great tips in your post though. Thank you for your time.

Mark Liebrand
DJ Darkside 2001-20xx 
www.djdarkside.com
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Running: Windows 10 64 bit, Sonar Platinum, Ableton Live, Novation Impulse, Native Instruments Maschine, a few mics, 1963 Fender Strat, a Fender Jazz Bass and some secret weapons... EQ and Compression.
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bitflipper
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Re: Preparing a Client Mix 2017/02/26 09:23:05 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby glennstanton 2017/02/26 11:07:24
I can count on one hand the number of times I've normalized an audio file. And I've never raised any track to -1 dB on purpose. That almost guarantees a bad-sounding master, because 1 dB is not enough headroom for the master limiter to work with. And if every track is at -1 dB, when summed they will NOT total -1 dB on the master bus, but will almost certainly be in the red. (-1 + -1 != -1)
 
On hardware consoles, the Trim control is for reducing the levels of incoming signals, usually to avoid overdriving the board's preamp. Its role has evolved somewhat in the digital era. Now, SONAR calls it "Gain" rather than "Trim", reflecting the fact that it's not just a passive input pad anymore, but rather an early-stage volume control.
 
And yes, if you're dealing with pre-recorded tracks, the gain control should be used to get all the tracks into the same ballpark. There should be a reasonable balance - everything clearly audible - between tracks with all volume faders at unity. That's a good starting point for your mix. (It's what we used to call a "rough", although that term nowadays is just as likely to mean "first attempt at a mix".)
 
Once you've achieved that initial rough balance, look at the master bus peak levels. If it's hitting anywhere near the red, then your tracks are too hot and now is the time to get them under control using the Trim/Gain slider. If you find that one track needs an excessive amount of Trim/Gain adjustment, then that's when you reach for the Normalize feature.
 
 


All else is in doubt, so this is the truth I cling to. 

My Stuff
#6
greg_moreira
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Re: Preparing a Client Mix 2017/02/26 11:02:18 (permalink)
maybe Im explaining myself wrong.  I normalize everything to -1 before any mixing of any kind is done at any point.
so...to start with....  the raw tracks individually peak at -1.  of course if just left that way its going to smash the master and there wont be headroom.
 
I fix that in the mix, and I dont have any issue getting 4-6 DB of headroom in the master bus.
 
like for example say I get tracks from someone and the bass guitar recorded signal was trimmed nice and hot while recording, practically sitting at -1 as is.
 
and the vocal track signal was trimmed a little low, so 90 percent of the vocal is pretty far down on the meter when the fader is at unity.  I could either use the gain adjustment to bring down the bass to vocal level, or bring up vocal level up comparable to the bass with gain...   or I could just normalize them both to the same number.  I hear no different in the end result, and I dont believe there is in reality.  I dont think that 'normalizing' is doing anything at all any differently than what the gain adjustment within the DAW would do.  You can test this by bringing in a track and duplicating it.
 
Set one with your gain/trim to whatever level you want.  "Normalize" the duplicate to the same level and they'll still phase cancel just fine.  You can normalize it in steps if you want.  Bring it down, then up, then down, then normalize to the same level, and it'll still phase cancel as if nothing has changed.  This tells me that normalizing isnt adding any artifacts of any kind that the trim/gain adjustment doesnt also add.
 
So...  to me it is a much faster way to get all tracks at a similar peak level to start with than individually 'gaining' each channel.  Just CTRL A, and normalize.  
 
You could debate whether starting each track at -1 is a bad decision.  I wont argue with you on that.  I just happen to like having hot signals on all my inputs/tracks as a starting point
 
If I am missing something with my understanding of normalize vs gain though, I'm all ears.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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greg_moreira
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Re: Preparing a Client Mix 2017/02/26 11:07:35 (permalink)
DJ Darkside
greg_moreira
I normalize every track to -1 to start with and I can't think of a time where I've touched the gain/trim adjustment.

 
I have read before that, normalizing your audio is a no go? Just want to see what your response to that is? And maybe other people's responses to that?
 
Some great tips in your post though. Thank you for your time.



I've heard that before as well.  Im just not sure why.  I dont know if there is something going on that I dont know about(which is entirely possible), or if this is just a myth that folks perpetuate that normalizing does something "bad".
 
As I was explaining in my last post....  you can take two duplicating files and adjust one with the input gain in the daw....  and normalize the other to the same level and I hear no difference at all.  Whether you put them both to -6 or you put them both to -1 or wherever you put them,...  So to my ears, and with a phase test, both tracks "seemingly" respond identically.
 
So I normalize simply because its faster.  
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greg_moreira
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Re: Preparing a Client Mix 2017/02/26 11:13:59 (permalink)
One last thing.  If we are talking perceived volume....  then obviously my method doesnt create balance.
 
I tried to explain in my first post, a solid wave with minimal transient peaks normalized to -1(or using gain to put it to -1) is going to be a lot louder than a very dynamic instrument/voice with big transients also set to a peak of -1.
 
they wont be level matched. They will 'peak' at the same point.....but obviously one is louder than the other overall.  And RMS check would show this too. 
 
If you're trying to level match all the tracks as a starting point...  then you need to play with gain.  Normalizing cant do that if balance from the start is what you want, so sorry if that caused confusion.
 
 
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peter47
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Re: Preparing a Client Mix 2017/02/26 14:01:47 (permalink)
ok guys some interesting advice here, i am a little confused, i understand there is "normalize" found in the process menu under "apply effect" and there to is the "gain" function, but there is also a "gain" knob at the top of the tracks strip and there is a "gain" automation function by pressing t in the highlighted clip then choosing clip automation-gain.. and moving the gain automation with ctrl up or down with mouse...so which "gain" do we use? also for reference i am looking at a groove 3 vid with Kenny Gioia, mixing in reel time..he is using reaper, he normalize the track in question then fine adjusts with gain to get a level in a rough mix..so this is a bit complex..it seems there is no right or wrong way???
Peter...learning as i go along....
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DJ Darkside
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Re: Preparing a Client Mix 2017/02/26 14:09:33 (permalink)
peter47
ok guys some interesting advice here, i am a little confused, i understand there is "normalize" found in the process menu under "apply effect" and there to is the "gain" function, but there is also a "gain" knob at the top of the tracks strip and there is a "gain" automation function by pressing t in the highlighted clip then choosing clip automation-gain.. and moving the gain automation with ctrl up or down with mouse...so which "gain" do we use? also for reference i am looking at a groove 3 vid with Kenny Gioia, mixing in reel time..he is using reaper, he normalize the track in question then fine adjusts with gain to get a level in a rough mix..so this is a bit complex..it seems there is no right or wrong way???
Peter...learning as i go along....




Peter - Great addition to the conversation. I like the way it's going because it sort of getting all the cards on the table. I am hoping someone with some technical training comes along and adds their feedback. 
 
greg_moreira - I appreciate you getting involved as well. At the end of the day, this is art and we will all have opinions. I want to be sure we all gain knowledge and understanding from this topic.
 
I appreciate everyone getting involved in the conversation and putting out their ideas.
 
I am looking forward to more ideas, tips and advice to help us all progress in the mix engineering world. I really want to step up my game so that I can eventually step up what I charge for my work. I have to earn those stripes first. At the end of the day, I love what I do. I just want to sharpen the sword and have more knowledge to back the decisions I am along the way.

Mark Liebrand
DJ Darkside 2001-20xx 
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greg_moreira
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Re: Preparing a Client Mix 2017/02/26 14:38:19 (permalink)
exactly.  Im not trying to say my way is the right way at all.  Just trying to explain why I do it, and its entirely possible that its the wrong way lol....or at least maybe there is a 'better' way.
 
as far as doing things the 'right way' goes....  I believe its pretty subjective.  In other words....  if you really love the quality of mixes that a certain guy turns out, then he is doing it the right way for you.  It would make sense to learn what you can about his approach and ultimately add your own thing to it.
 
there would be no good reason for you to emulate what im doing, for example, if you didnt particularly care for the quality or sound of something I put together.  Even if I could cite a scientific explanation for why I do XY and Z....still, its not right if you or your clients dont like it.
 
 
 
 
 
 
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DJ Darkside
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Re: Preparing a Client Mix 2017/02/26 15:21:45 (permalink)
greg_moreira
exactly.  Im not trying to say my way is the right way at all.  Just trying to explain why I do it, and its entirely possible that its the wrong way lol....or at least maybe there is a 'better' way.
 
as far as doing things the 'right way' goes....  I believe its pretty subjective.  In other words....  if you really love the quality of mixes that a certain guy turns out, then he is doing it the right way for you.  It would make sense to learn what you can about his approach and ultimately add your own thing to it.
 
there would be no good reason for you to emulate what im doing, for example, if you didnt particularly care for the quality or sound of something I put together.  Even if I could cite a scientific explanation for why I do XY and Z....still, its not right if you or your clients dont like it.
 



greg_moreira - I guess the deal breaker with what we do is.... Does the client like it? if they do, then you have delivered them a quality mix.

Mark Liebrand
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greg_moreira
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Re: Preparing a Client Mix 2017/02/26 16:22:05 (permalink)
DJ Darkside
 
 
greg_moreira - I guess the deal breaker with what we do is.... Does the client like it? if they do, then you have delivered them a quality mix.




no doubt!  I tend to ask folks what artists they like and who's record they would like to sound similar to.
 
Then when it comes time for them to listen to their mix....  I can queue up something they like as a reference just so they can see that their project is in the same vein of what they said they wanted.  Especially with younger guys who are newer to the whole game....and each member of the band wants to be louder than every other member....  it helps to ease their concerns.  
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DJ Darkside
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Re: Preparing a Client Mix 2017/02/27 01:58:12 (permalink)
Definitely! I also ask for the client to send reference songs that I can work towards the sound they are after or at least get close.
 
The reason for this reason post is to get fine details about how people set up their mixes:
  • Their gain inputs and outputs
  • How to prevent clippings from clipping
  • What levels the meters should be peaking at 
  • When and when not to use normalization
  • Bus routing ideas
  • Panning techniques
  • Reverb techniques
  • etc...
The more technical side of things...

Mark Liebrand
DJ Darkside 2001-20xx 
www.djdarkside.com
-------------------------------------------------------
Running: Windows 10 64 bit, Sonar Platinum, Ableton Live, Novation Impulse, Native Instruments Maschine, a few mics, 1963 Fender Strat, a Fender Jazz Bass and some secret weapons... EQ and Compression.
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greg_moreira
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Re: Preparing a Client Mix 2017/02/27 09:46:23 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby glennstanton 2017/03/03 17:39:49
DJ Darkside
Definitely! I also ask for the client to send reference songs that I can work towards the sound they are after or at least get close.
 
The reason for this reason post is to get fine details about how people set up their mixes:
  • Their gain inputs and outputs.  - If I am doing the recording, each individual signal is trimmed as hot as possible wthout ever clipping at the loudest points.  I'll ask folks to sing/scream/play as loud and as hard as they are going to play during the course of the song and set their trim at that point.  
  • How to prevent clippings from clipping - if step one was done right, I get no track level clips anywhere.  "If" there were ever a point where there was a clip....as long as its not extreme, it can be fixed.  A quick digital pop from a drum hit peaking for example can easily be removed without notice with a good crackle reducer plugin.  Lots out there that seem to work well.   Each plugin has the input or output gain adjusted to make sure that the track does not get any louder or peak any higher from one to the next.  So, after 0 plugins or 10 plugins, its still going to sound as loud as the source material.  It may very well peak lower now though after some compression has squashed some of the transients.
  • What levels the meters should be peaking at - as I was stating earlier, Im not looking for an initial level balance between instruments.  I want every individual track to peak at -1.  All those peaks are the transient material.  those initial hits and impacts and what have you.  Im primarily a rock and metal guy, so I try to preserve those transients to get all the punch and snap out of each individual piece.  RMS levels/audible volume is going to vary from track to track but a combo of compression and mixing with the faders is where I create balance.....   hopefully leaving the transients and keeping them loud.
  • When and when not to use normalization - I only use it to get each track peaking at the same place as a starting point.  Again..  just my method and not entirely necessary just depending on how you like to approach things
  • Bus routing ideas - lead vox goes to a lead vox bus with one treatment.   Harmony vox goes to a harmony vox bus so I can do something different(a different delay or reverb or eq or whatever).  Both lead and harmony busses output to an overall vocals bus where I can glue them together.  that overall vox bus outputs to the master.  Often on the overall vox bus, I use a send to run to a reverb or delay bus so that all vox summed can have a consistent verb or delay added.  I might sidechain compress in those sends to duck the level of the delays and verbs when the voice is singing.  
  • guitars are simpler for me.  I treat each individual track and output every guitar to a single guitar bus.  Guitar bus outputs to master, and I use a send on the guitar bus to run to a reverb channel too if I want to add just a tad to every guitar.
  • For bass, I usually duplicate the bass line track 3 times.  One is the original and is pretty well preserved as is, minus light compression and maybe some EQ to shape.  The 2nd bass track I parallel compress and squash the life out of it.  Kill all the transients and make the bass sound very round and full(and unnatural too).  I blend it in to taste.  The 3rd track, I high pass it around 250hz or so, so im getting out most of the lows.  I run it through and amp sim and add some dirt and midrange.  I blend this track in just to add enough dirt to give the bass some cut and growl.  I buss all 3 to a single bass buss and use a light compression to glue it all together.
  • Drums are where I invest most effort if the whole kit was mic'd properly and I have enough sources to play with(I usually use 9 or 10 mics when doing a 5 piece kit myself).  Each track, drums and overheads and room(s) get outputted to a master drum buss. compression is light with a 30ms attack and moderate release to keep transients and keep it sounding lively and natural.  I use sends on the individual kick, snare, and tom tracks to send them to a parallel compression bus.  I squash the life out of them, just like the bass guitar, in that bus to make the drums sound really round and have depth.  I keep cymbals out of this bus so that they dont get splooshy with the excess compression.  I then output the parallell compressed drum bus to the master drum bus and blend in to taste just to make the drums sound rounder.  That master drum bus has a send to a drum verb bus also if needed to add some roominess.  Lastly....  if the drums arent present enough, I use drum replacer and create midi events for each individual drum itself, then run those into addictive drums and lightly blend kick, snare, and tom samples outputted to the master drum bus.  It doesnt take much.  Blending just a bit of each sample in brings the drums forward.
  • Panning techniques - I usually keep it kinda simple.  I use track lanes to automate pans.  Like during the verse, guitars are 70% left and right.  During the chorus, they open up to 90% left and right.  Same with the overheads.  70% during the verse opening to 90% in the chorus.  Its subtle but it makes the song seem like it grew once the chorus hits.   If I use sends, I automate the send pans the same way
  • Reverb techniques - also kept simple usually.  If I need it on an individual track(like only a snare) sometimes I just put it directly on a track.  If I want the whole bus of instruments to be affected by the same verb, I use sends and on the reverb bus I dial out all the dry in the mix and only leave the wet verb and dial in to taste.  Sometimes maybe side chaining so that the verb ducks a bit when the instrument or voice comes in.  Really only adding space between phrases etc.
  • the next to last step is to mix to taste, then check the output on the master.  If the output on the master is peaking too high I select everything and hold CTRL and drag every single fader down the exact same amt simultaneously untill its somewhere between -4 to -6 on the master.  then export the whole thing at 24/44.1 with no dithering anywhere and open a new session to master the thing.  In the mastering chain, the last plugin is usually a limiter that can apply dithering.  Ill set the sample to 16 bit in the limiter and add dithering, then export the master at 16/44.1(with no dithering because it was done with my limiter plugin).
  • the last step is to listen to the mix in a dozen different sources and then start over because I hate how some things sound in the car or in the home theatre or whatever lol.
  • it sounds like a lot but it isnt when you have a track template built with all the plugins and busses and sends pre - added.  Make it a big enough template to support more tracks than you typically have and you're never having to stop and add any new tracks or anything.
The more technical side of things...




 
Just to give a more thorough explanation of what I do and why I do it..  I answered above
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DJ Darkside
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Re: Preparing a Client Mix 2017/02/28 02:06:24 (permalink)
greg_moreira - Fantastic insight into your process. This might just become the holy grail for some of us. Thank you.
 
I think I will take notes from people's feedback here and start morphing my own process. Again, it is art! But we do need some direction.
 
Cheers again!

Mark Liebrand
DJ Darkside 2001-20xx 
www.djdarkside.com
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Running: Windows 10 64 bit, Sonar Platinum, Ableton Live, Novation Impulse, Native Instruments Maschine, a few mics, 1963 Fender Strat, a Fender Jazz Bass and some secret weapons... EQ and Compression.
#17
DJ Darkside
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Re: Preparing a Client Mix 2017/02/28 02:25:51 (permalink)
Another extension to this tip which I think could help me. I recently received some multi-tracks from a client and the audio is very low. Are there any tips anyone can provide for dealing with this? I don't want to boost the audio and add noise. Am I not sure this client knows about the levels they need to record at? From the looks of it, not!
 
This is a hip-hop beat that they want mixing. I don't think re-sending the audio files at a higher volume is an option. Has this ever happened to any of you? If so, what was your approach to dealing with it?
 

Mark Liebrand
DJ Darkside 2001-20xx 
www.djdarkside.com
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Running: Windows 10 64 bit, Sonar Platinum, Ableton Live, Novation Impulse, Native Instruments Maschine, a few mics, 1963 Fender Strat, a Fender Jazz Bass and some secret weapons... EQ and Compression.
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greg_moreira
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Re: Preparing a Client Mix 2017/02/28 08:54:41 (permalink)
It would depend on the source material and how much 'noise' there really is.  Sometimes the noise is never noticeable when mixed with the audio, but it pops out during quiet parts.
 
If its only really noticeable when quiet...  I would try to cheat it first with a gate with a lookahead(like the sonitus one has I believe in sonar).  Put it first in the chain and adjust the gate so that it doesnt eliminate any audio, but promptly closes when the instrument sound goes away... effectively eliminating line noise during the 'silence".   That lookahead will keep the gate opening sounding natural.....allowing it to open just before the wave starts(so its not unnatural sounding because it pops in from a fast attack....and/or cutting off too much transient because you've set a slow attack to keep the popping out).
 
That alone might do the trick.  If you struggle to get a gate setting that works naturally, you could spend a little more time doing the same thing with track volume envelopes.   
 
Another thing to try is a noise reducer plugin.  Plop it right on the track that is the problem and let it study and learn the noise profile during periods of silence.  The suck the noise out of the whole track.  Careful though.  this can be destructive to audio and actually hurt your sound.  Its basically a try it and see if it works kinda thing.
 
If the noise is simply too obvious and you cant reduce it without somehow hurting the audio...  I would let them know and see what they have to say
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DJ Darkside
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Re: Preparing a Client Mix 2017/03/03 09:32:36 (permalink)
greg_moreira - I guess I can try and normalize and see what results I get? Some of the audio is so low, I can even see it peaking on the meters in Sonar. I can hear it, or if I change the audio meter scale, then I can see it.
 
I need to educate the client on getting better volume per track. It seems as if they mixed the song themselves and then applied, or bounced the tracks and then exported them and sent them over to me that way? I was expecting much hotter levels.
 
I made the mistake of not mentioning it earlier and worked myself into a corner. Now they are expecting a mix and I don't know how to deal with it?
 
I'll try and normalize to -1dB and see how much noise gets introduced and go from there.

Mark Liebrand
DJ Darkside 2001-20xx 
www.djdarkside.com
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Running: Windows 10 64 bit, Sonar Platinum, Ableton Live, Novation Impulse, Native Instruments Maschine, a few mics, 1963 Fender Strat, a Fender Jazz Bass and some secret weapons... EQ and Compression.
#20
greg_moreira
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Re: Preparing a Client Mix 2017/03/03 15:01:39 (permalink)
ouch yeah that can be tough with them that low.  when its so low you can barely see the wave form or barely see it working the track meter....  its 'probably' going to introduce a ton of noise seeing that the audio is likely close to the noise floor.
 
i would amplify it and test it first, cause hey you never know.  might not be as bad as youd think.
 
but definitely id educate them a little for future reference. makes everyones life easier :)
#21
DJ Darkside
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Re: Preparing a Client Mix 2017/03/05 18:43:09 (permalink)
Cool, will give it a go. Thanks again Greg.

Mark Liebrand
DJ Darkside 2001-20xx 
www.djdarkside.com
-------------------------------------------------------
Running: Windows 10 64 bit, Sonar Platinum, Ableton Live, Novation Impulse, Native Instruments Maschine, a few mics, 1963 Fender Strat, a Fender Jazz Bass and some secret weapons... EQ and Compression.
#22
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