DIY Studio furniture

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rockoman
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2007/12/27 20:15:30 (permalink)

DIY Studio furniture

I am looking for any references that have blueprints for building your own studio furniture, specifically a mixing desk. My Mackie 24x8 is going to be the center of it all :)

Or, if you have a Mackie 24x8. What are using?
Thanks!
post edited by rockoman - 2007/12/27 20:34:01

It's not what we're doing, it's how you do it :)



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    MandolinPicker
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    RE: DIY Studio furniture 2007/12/27 20:58:42 (permalink)
    Try this site

    http://plans.thefrankes.com/Forum/index.php

    He has a bunch of different studio furniture plans, some are free.

    The Mandolin Picker
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    #2
    ohhey
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    RE: DIY Studio furniture 2007/12/27 22:06:08 (permalink)
    ORIGINAL: rockoman

    I am looking for any references that have blueprints for building your own studio furniture, specifically a mixing desk. My Mackie 24x8 is going to be the center of it all :)

    Or, if you have a Mackie 24x8. What are using?
    Thanks!


    Shoudn't be hard the 24x8 is just a rectangle. The D8B was a little hard because of the stuff on the front but the 24x8 should be easy. Just design in a hole for the 24x8 and a nice arm rest would be cool, and maybe a shelf over the top to set near field or computer monitors on. Make it very sturdy ! A lot of folks like to lean on the console and put their body weight on it to help stand up, or even sit on it, and you don't want it to tip or break. If you don't have a welding rig 2x4s and bolts should do fine. It only has to look good on the outside :-) I like to use bolts and no glue so I can re-drill and change the height or add on if needed later.

    Even if you get the depth wrong you can always shim the 24x8 to sit the way you want it as long as it fits side to side so it looks nice. I also like the idea of having rack space on at least one side and have it set down a bit so you can place a inset top over it when not in use to give a clean look and use as a mouse surface if needed. Just make sure air can get in from the bottom and out the back and that the depth will be enough so the top doesn't hit any knobs or plugs sticking up.

    Think about your workflow in the studio and plan the desk around that. What do you need to be able to touch from the sweet spot, what needs to be handy, and how often do you need to be able to get to the back and bottom to repatch stuff ? Design in cable management if you can to keep things neat and keep AC and audio lines seperate as much as you can. It's OK if they cross like this + but you don't want them laying next to each other.
    post edited by ohhey - 2007/12/27 22:29:26
    #3
    yep
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    RE: DIY Studio furniture 2007/12/28 00:45:16 (permalink)
    My experience is that big, broad, open work surfaces with more space than you think you will need work out best over time, while dense, space-efficient, cleverly-designed multi-platform purpose-made desks tend to reveal frustrating limitations in the real world (why anyone would want fixed-position desktop speaker stands is beyond me).

    In any case, whatever your budget and woodworking skill, be sure to check out places like staples and Ikea for regular old office desks before making a final decision. There is really very little difference between a good workbench and a good studio desk, and it is pretty easy to add racks, slide-out keyboard trays, speaker stands, and such if you really want them, and these sorts of add-ons that you attach to (or just sit on top of) the desk are movable if you change your mind, whereas purpose-made "studio desks" are often locked into whatever configuration looked best in the catalog on the day you decided to buy.

    My two cents.

    Cheers.
    #4
    krizrox
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    RE: DIY Studio furniture 2007/12/28 08:49:12 (permalink)

    ORIGINAL: yep

    My experience is that big, broad, open work surfaces with more space than you think you will need work out best over time, while dense, space-efficient, cleverly-designed multi-platform purpose-made desks tend to reveal frustrating limitations in the real world (why anyone would want fixed-position desktop speaker stands is beyond me).

    My two cents.

    Cheers.


    Agree 100% I've worked in those hi-tech yet very un-ergonomic control rooms and hated every minute I was there. Work space is more important than looks as far as I'm concerned. In fact, I'm willing to risk perfection in terms of monitor placement, mixer placement, etc in favor of comfort and lot's of work space.

    Ohhey is right about people leaning on this stuff too. You can't make this stuff people-proof enough. Any square inch of space becomes a butt resting place.

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    #5
    themidiroom
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    RE: DIY Studio furniture 2007/12/28 15:03:28 (permalink)

    ORIGINAL: krizrox

    Ohhey is right about people leaning on this stuff too. You can't make this stuff people-proof enough. Any square inch of space becomes a butt resting place.

    That's why I went through the trouble of bolting my desk to the floor.

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    #6
    OffAnAirplane
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    RE: DIY Studio furniture 2007/12/28 15:53:32 (permalink)
    ORIGINAL: yep

    My experience is that big, broad, open work surfaces with more space than you think you will need work out best over time, while dense, space-efficient, cleverly-designed multi-platform purpose-made desks tend to reveal frustrating limitations in the real world (why anyone would want fixed-position desktop speaker stands is beyond me).

    In any case, whatever your budget and woodworking skill, be sure to check out places like staples and Ikea for regular old office desks before making a final decision. There is really very little difference between a good workbench and a good studio desk, and it is pretty easy to add racks, slide-out keyboard trays, speaker stands, and such if you really want them, and these sorts of add-ons that you attach to (or just sit on top of) the desk are movable if you change your mind, whereas purpose-made "studio desks" are often locked into whatever configuration looked best in the catalog on the day you decided to buy.

    My two cents.

    Cheers.


    +1

    And also, having done some woodworking in the past. I can tell you that if you really build this thing sturdy, you can actually spend more than it would cost to just buy one from IKEA or Staples, or whatever. And it may be worth it to you, but you'll have to decide that for yourself.

    Do your research. Go to Lowe's or Home Depot and see what the materials would cost. Also, do you have all the tools, saws, etc? If not, you have to figure that into your cost also.


    post edited by OffAnAirplane - 2007/12/28 16:07:57

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    #7
    rockoman
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    RE: DIY Studio furniture 2007/12/29 14:51:20 (permalink)
    Thanks for the awesome replies!!!! I do have my own tools so that's not going to be a prob. I will post pictures of whatever I decide to go with. The link Mandolin Picker provided has a lot of nice plans. I was looking at the project showcase and I must say I was amazed.
    Check it out: http://plans.thefrankes.com/Forum/viewforum.php?f=3 you don't need to be a member to view the photos.

    I will incorporate all your tips and suggestions. Thank you so much!
    post edited by rockoman - 2007/12/29 15:05:19

    It's not what we're doing, it's how you do it :)



    #8
    yep
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    RE: DIY Studio furniture 2007/12/29 15:14:57 (permalink)

    ORIGINAL: rockoman

    Thanks for the awesome replies!!!! I do have my own tools so that's not going to be a prob. I will post pictures of whatever I decide to go with. The link Mandolin Picker provided has a lot of nice plans. I was looking at the project showcase and I must say I was amazed.
    Check it out: http://plans.thefrankes.com/Forum/viewforum.php?f=3 you don't need to be a member to view the photos.

    I will incorporate all your tips and suggestions. Thank you so much!


    Some of those look very impressive, but functionally I'd still prefer a plain table with racks on castors to slide underneath.

    FWIW.

    Have fun whichever way you go.

    Cheers.
    #9
    gibsongs
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    Re:DIY Studio furniture 2012/01/12 08:32:52 (permalink)
     If you are intrested on "rolling your own" Goggle Sketchup is a great program to play in. It allows you to paint surfaces and do three dimensional walk arounds. It is also has things called Ruby Scripts which are plug ins to add features. http://sketchup.google.com/download/ gs
    #10
    Guitarhacker
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    Re:DIY Studio furniture 2012/01/12 09:06:02 (permalink)
    spammer dragging up old threads.....reported

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    gibsongs
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    Re:DIY Studio furniture 2012/01/12 13:23:05 (permalink)
     HUH???
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