Helpful Replywhy gibson is less popular then fender these days?

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zungle
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 02:15:54 (permalink)
Here's a few great Strat players from the 60's/ 70's/80's..................

Its a real shame they didn't go all out Gibson............

They may have been famous.............


Hendrix
Blackmore
Bolin,
Walsh
Gilmour 
Malmsteen
Beck
Blew
Knopler
Mayer
Oldfield
J.Young
Lifeson
Trower..............personal favorite.
SRV

Don't get me wrong I know there were alot of Gibson guys in that era(playing Norlins )

But a few guys on my list had at least small success on their thin sounding guitars.
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offnote
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 02:24:49 (permalink)
zungle


Or are you saying your still stuck in that era and just don't relate to new Rock Music? 



FYI, Rock Music is dead today. 

#32
sharke
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 02:31:33 (permalink)
I draw the line at Malmsteen. 
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zungle
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 02:37:31 (permalink)
zungle Or are you saying your still stuck in that era and just don't relate to new Rock Music?  FYI, Rock Music is dead today. 





For many folks your  likely spot on.........


But for myself, I have found numerous bands I dig.


I like the current versatility of the new rock music...............


Is rock being dominated by Country,Pop and Hip Hop.............or any combination there of......yes.


I don't listen to the radio for music anyways,so its no problem.............


I pack an IPOD Touch with my collection and Pandora Radio.................theres lots of good new rock on that combo.............
#34
offnote
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 02:40:50 (permalink)
BTW your list is quite short, here you have Gibson players...

 §  Johnny A uses a Johnny A Signature model designed specifically for him by Gibson to the guitarist's personal specifications.[1]
§  Jan Akkerman has used a Gibson L5Les Paul Custom and a modified Les Paul Personal. The Custom is the guitar he is generally associated with.[2]
§  Duane Allman (The Allman Brothers Band) used a 1957 Les Paul Goldtop with PAF pickups, a 1959 cherry sunburst Les Paul, a 1958 tobacco sunburst Les Paul and a 1968 cherry SG which he used for slide guitar.[3]
§  Billie Joe Armstrong (Green Day) uses several vintage 1950s single and double cutaway Les Paul Junior models. Gibson has produced a Billie Joe Armstrong Signature Les Paul Junior Doublecut model and a Billie Joe Armstrong Signature Les Paul Junior model.[4]
§  Chet Atkins switched from Gretsch to Gibson in the mid 1980s and brought with him the popular Country Gentleman and Tennessean model designs. Atkins also helped to design several innovative acoustic/electric models including the SST, the CE, and the C.E.C. Since his death, Gibson has discontinued all Chet Atkins models and Gretsch has resumed the manufacturing and distribution of the Chet Atkins line.[citation needed]
§  Martin Barre (Jethro Tull) has used numerous Gibson models over the course of his career including: a sunburst ES-330, a 1958 Les Paul Special and a 1959 Les Paul Standard.[5]
§  Jeff Beck (The Yardbirds/solo) purchased his first Les Paul, a 1959 model, for £150 while still a member of The Yardbirds. Beck's fascination with the guitar sprang as much from his interest in Les Paul, the man, as from his love of the guitar itself. Beck told an interviewer: "It had a deep powerful sound and you could use it to imitate just about anything - violin, sax, cello, even a sitar."[6] Beck also used an "oxblood" coloured 1954 Les Paul Standard, with PAF pickups, from 1972 to 1976 and is pictured with the guitar on the cover artwork of his Blow by Blow album.
 
§  Franny Beecher played a black 1956 Les Paul Custom throughout his career with Bill Haley and the Comets in the 1950s and early 1960s.[citation needed]
§  Anthony Duster Bennett (British blues singer, harmonica player and musician) played a 1952 Les Paul Goldtop throughout his career that had been given to him in 1968 by Peter Green. After Bennett's death the guitar was given to musician Anthony Top Topham.[7]
§  Wayne Bennett (Bobby Bland) used a white Byrdland[8]
§  George Benson (Gibson L5) Great Jazz player[9]
§  Chuck Berry used an ES-350T early in his career, later switching to ES-345s and ES-355s.[10]
§  Dickey Betts (The Allman Brothers Band) uses a variety of Gibson models including a 1961 SG and a 1957 Les Paul.[citation needed]
§  Mike Bloomfield (The Paul Butterfield Blues BandThe Electric Flag) During his tenure with the Butterfield Blues Band he used a 1954 Gibson Les Paul, which he used for some of the East-Westsessions. In due course, according to biographers Jan Mark Wolkin and Bill Keenom, Bloomfield swapped that guitar for a 1959 Les Paul Standard and $100. This was the guitar Bloomfield used as a member of the Electric Flag, and on the Super Session album and concerts. He later veered between the Les Paul and the Fender Telecaster, but Bloomfield's use of the Les Paul, as did Keith Richards' with the Rolling Stones and Eric Clapton's with John Mayall influenced many others to use the model. Bloomfield eventually lost the guitar in Canada; Wolkin and Keenom's biography revealed a club owner kept the guitar as partial compensation after Bloomfield cut short a round of appearances. Its whereabouts today are unknown.[citation needed]
§  Marc Bolan (T.Rex) used Les Paul Standards, Customs and Flying Vs and a Japanese Hummingbird copy. His main Les Paul model was refinished in an opaque orange to resemble the Gretschguitars played by his hero Eddie Cochran.[11]
§  Mick Box (Uriah Heep) uses a Les Paul Custom. Also used a 1958 double-cutaway Les Paul Junior, a Flying V and a 1968 SG with a Maestro tailpiece.[citation needed]
§  Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown used various Gibsons including ES-335s and L5s. His main guitar was a late-60s non-reverse Firebird.[citation needed]
§  Jack Bruce (Cream/solo) used several EB-3 basses during the late 1960s and early 1970s; during the 2005 Cream reunion concerts he used a 1950s EB bass.[citation needed]
§  Buckethead (real name: Brian Carroll) uses several Les Pauls custom-made by Gibson which feature oversized bodies, 24-fret necks, dimarzio pickups and his trademark kill switch. They are usually all white. He is also known to own a modified Les Paul custom in alpine white with gold hardware.[citation needed]
§  Sam Bush, a highly respected mandolin player, has been a mainstay on the Bluegrass circuit for over 35 years. Gibson produces a Sam Bush Signature model mandolin.[citation needed]
§  Larry Carlton favours a sunburst 1968 ES-335, also occasionally using a 1956 Les Paul Special and a 1963 L5.[12] A Larry Carlton Signature model has been produced by Gibson for the man they call "Mr 335".[13]
§  Maybelle Carter, matriarch of the Carter Family and one of the earliest country recording stars, played a 1928 L-5 archtop almost exclusively. "I consider this to be the most important single guitar in the entire history of country music" said George Gruhn.[14]
 
§  Charlie Christian used an ES-150. The model was Gibson's first archtop electric guitar and was, as described by author Tony Bacon, "used with devastating effect by Christian throughout his short career." The "blade" style pickup installed on early ES-150 models has since become known as the "Charlie Christian pickup" in honor of the legendary jazzman.[15]
§  John Cipollina (Quicksilver Messenger Service) used two heavily customized SGs with bat-shaped plastic embellishments cut from pickguard material, extensive bindings, older Les Paul pickups (with the neck pickup mounted in reverse), Grover Imperial tuning machines, and mercury dimes glued to the tops of the volume and tone controls. He also added Bigsby B5 vibrato assemblies to both guitars.[16]
§  Eric Clapton has used a variety of Gibsons throughout his career. The second electric guitar Clapton owned was a red 1964 ES-335 that he used with The YardbirdsCreamBlind Faith and as a solo artist.[17] In 2004 Clapton donated the guitar to an auction to benefit the Crossroads Centre, where it sold for $750,000 – a world-record auction price for a Gibson.[18] In 1965 Clapton bought a 1960 sunburst Les Paul that he used while a member of John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers and Cream.[19] This was the first of several 1958-60 Les Pauls that Clapton has used, contributing significantly to these models' popularity.[20] In 1967 Clapton acquired a 1964 SG painted by the Dutch artists collectively known as The Fool; he used this guitar on the Cream albums Disraeli Gearsand Wheels of Fire.[21] Other models Clapton has used extensively include a Firebird I and a 1958 Explorer that he used on his 461 Ocean Boulevard[22] and EC Was Here albums.
§  Steve Clark (Def Leppard) Throughout his career, Clark used various Les Pauls,[23] including a rare Les Paul XR-1 as his main instrument during his Pyromania years,[24][23] as well as various Firebirds and EDS-1275 double-necks[23]
§  Allen Collins (Lynyrd SkynyrdThe Rossington-Collins BandAllen Collins Band) used a Firebird, and later switched to an Explorer. Starting in late 1977, he also occasionally used a double-cutaway Les Paul Junior.[citation needed]
§  Stompin' Tom Connors used an SJ-200 (purchased from a furniture store for $80) from 1956 to 1972; he owns it to this day.[25]
§  Sheryl Crow uses a Country Western model, Hummingbird, L-00 Blues King, J-200 Western Classic, 96 Advanced Jumbo, 96 Southern Jumbo, J45, ES-120, ES-125, ES-335 and various Les Pauls. Her original Country&Western model from the Sixties was exactly measured and reproduced as the "Sheryl Crow Signature" in a limited edition with autographed label on the inside.[26]
§  Dave Davies (The Kinks) has used numerous Gibson models over the years, including a 1958 Flying V (prototype model), a 1960 Goldtop Les Paul and a 1978 Artisan.[27]
§  Reverend Gary Davis used a Gibson SJ-200 and a slope souldered Gibson B-45-12 twelve-string guitar.[citation needed]
§  Buck Dharma (Blue Öyster Cult) played a 1969 SG and used an ES 175 for the guitar riff in "Don't Fear The Reaper".[28] He also used a 1974 Les Paul.[citation needed]
§  Al Di Meola joined Chick Corea's Return to Forever in 1974 (at age 19), and became an influential jazz-rock fusion guitarist thereafter. He used a Les Paul model almost exclusively for his electric guitar work, particularly on his early solo albums.[29]
§  Bob Dylan uses a variety of Gibson models, including a J-50, a J-200, a J-180 and a J-45.[citation needed]
 
§  Elliot Easton (The Cars) used several Gibson SG models and a Les Paul Custom in the "Since You're Gone" video. Gibson currently produces an Elliot Easton signature model SG as part of their "Inspired By" series manufactured by the Gibson Custom Shop.[citation needed]
§  Duane Eddy - "The King of Twang Guitar" - has used many different Gibson models throughout his career. Gibson produces a Duane Eddy Signature model.[30]
§  The Edge (U2) uses several Gibson models including a 1976 Gibson Explorer Limited Edition,[31] a Les Paul Custom, a 1983 30th Anniversary Goldtop, an ES-335, an SG and a J-200.
§  John Entwistle (The Who) used several Thunderbird IV basses during the early 1970s and later used custom-made "Fenderbird" models with Fender Precision Bass necks. Entwistle also used an EB-2 bass during the early days of The Who.[citation needed]
§  The Everly Brothers favoured J-200s in the 1950s; in the 1960s they used the Everly Brothers model, featuring a J-185-style body and an adjustable bridge, which Gibson produced from 1962 to 1972.[citation needed]
§  Tal Farlow usually played an ES-350. Gibson made a "Tal Farlow" model in their Artist Model series beginning in 1962.
§  Peter Frampton (Humble Pie and a solo artist) uses a 3 pickup Les Paul Custom. Gibson has produced 2 completely different Signature models for him.
§  Ace Frehley (Kiss) used a 3 pickup Les Paul Custom as well as an Ace Frehley Signature model[32] and an EDS-1275.[33] He also used a Les Paul Standard.
§  Jerry Garcia (Grateful Dead) played on Gibson Les Paul and Gibson SG guitars early in his career, but from the early 1970s onward generally preferred custom built instruments.[34]
§  Hank Garland (Nashville guitarist who worked with Elvis Presley among others) worked with Gibson and fellow Nashville player Billy Byrd to design the Byrdland guitar, which was named for them (Byrd + Garland). Garland also played an ES-150 and an electrified L-7.[35]
 
§  Billy Gibbons (ZZ Top) has used several different Gibson models over the course of his career including Goldtop Les Pauls, Flying Vs, Explorers, ES-5 Switchmasters and Les Paul Juniors. His main guitar is a 1959 Les Paul Standard nicknamed "Pearly Gates". "Pearly has such an unmistakable character that we felt it was necessary to find another instrument with a similar sound to use as a spare guitar. We accumulated dozens of guitars, but nothing quite matched her. But instead of tossing these other acquisitions away, they kept accumulating. It's an ongoing saga that never ends."[36][37]
§  Freddie Green (rhythm guitarist with the Count Basie Orchestra) - known as "Mr. Clock", Green played a blonde L5.
§  Grant Green Influential jazz guitarist who recorded more dates with the Blue Note record label in the early to mid-1960s than any other musician, both as a leader and as a sideman. He used a Gibson ES-330 during this period.[38]
§  Peter Green, formerly with John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers and the founder of Fleetwood Mac, is most notable for his 1959 Les Paul that had the pick-ups accidentally wired out of phase. Green bought and used it in almost every notable recording he made from 1965 to 1970.[39] The guitar used to be owned by Gary Moore, but it was sold to a private owner in 2006.
§  Dave Grohl (Foo FightersThem Crooked VulturesNirvana) uses many different Gibson models including: Les Pauls, the DG-335 (a Gibson custom made Trini Lopez inspired by him), Explorers, SGs, ES-335s, Firebirds, and a 1970s Trini Lopez Standard. He also has his own Gibson model, the DG-335, modeled after the Trini Lopez Standard.
§  Arlo Guthrie uses a 3/4 sized LG-2. Gibson currently produces an Arlo Guthrie Signature model.
§  Woody Guthrie used an L-0 and a Southern Jumbo. Gibson has replicated his 1945 model including his famous "this machine kills fascists" sign.
§  Steve Hackett (GenesisGTR) uses numerous Les Paul models. His main guitar for many years was a 1957 Goldtop. He also owns a black Les Paul custom fitted with a Fernandes Sustainer and Floyd Rose tremolo system.
§  Kirk Hammett (Metallica) has used various Flying V and Les Paul models throughout his career.[40]
§  Emmylou Harris uses a Dove, various J-200s and a J-200 Western Classic.
§  George Harrison used a Les Paul, an SG, an ES-345TD, a J-160E and a J-200.[41] One of the most famous Gibson guitars is George's Lucy
§  Warren Haynes (Gov't Mule) uses a Les Paul Custom, Les Paul Standard, SG, an ES-335 and a non-reverse Firebird. Gibson produces an "inspired by" version of Haynes' main Les Paul.
§  Justin Hayward (The Moody Blues) has used an ES-335 for his entire career.
§  Jimi Hendrix (The Jimi Hendrix Experience) is generally regarded as an iconic Stratocaster player, but Hendrix used several Gibson models including an SG Custom, Flying V, Les Paul Special and a Les Paul Custom. Gibson also gave him two guitars in 1970, a custom Flying V and an ES-345 (both left-handed models). Gibson has released an "inspired by" Flying V replicating his 1967 Flying V including the psychedelic floral design which Hendrix himself had hand painted on the original.[42]
§  James Hetfield (Metallica) has used various Explorer models and also a Les Paul Custom. He used a Cherry red Gibson SG for the filming of the "Turn the Page" Video[40]
§  Lightnin' Hopkins played a J-160e. It is now on display at the Rock Hall of Fame in Cleveland OH. Lightnin's last guitar was a 1980 Les Paul Silverburst given to him on his 68th birthday by his wife and his bass player, Congressman Ron Wilson. Both are part of the Joe Kessler Collection.
§  Steve Howe (YesAsiaGTR) favours an ES-175, and has also used an ES-345, an EDS-1275 and an ornate Les Paul model named "The Les Paul".[43] In 2002, Gibson introduced the Steve Howe Signature ES-175.[44]
§  Tony Iommi (Black Sabbath) has used an SG throughout most of his career, and also owns other Gibson models. Currently his collection includes a rare "Barney Kessel" left-handed model,[45] a red 1965 SG Special nicknamed "monkey" (used on all of Black Sabbath's early albums and pictured on the inside cover of Black Sabbath Vol. 4),[46] a red Custom Shop SG,[47] a black Custom Shop SG[48] and a black SG Standard.[49] Gibson has produced a Tony Iommi Signature SG.[50]
§  Matthias Jabs (Scorpions) uses over 20 different Explorers including 7 Korina models and several Explorer 90s. A prototype signature model was produced for him by Gibson which was 90% the size of a regular Explorer. Jabs also owns several Les Pauls as well as a Moderne.[citation needed]
§  Joan Jett the first female to get her own Gibson signature electric guitar model, a worn white Melody Maker, after years of faithful use of the model.[51]
§  Eric Johnson used an ES-335 for all but the bridge section of the recorded version of "Cliffs of Dover". Also uses the ES-335 during live performances. He can also be seen playing a Gibson SG in the "Eric Johnson-Art of Guitar" DVD.
§  Gordie Johnson (Big Sugar) has used many Gibson models in the past, notable a Les Paul Black Beauty, a vintage ES-335, a white double neck, and several other models. He also has a Gibson SGJ Signature model, which features P94 pickups in place of the standard P90s.[citation needed]
§  Robert Johnson used an L-1 acoustic.[52] Gibson makes a Robert Johnson Signature model.
§  Brian Jones (The Rolling Stones) used an acoustic SJ-200, an ES-330, reverse and non-reverse Firebirds[53] and a Les Paul Goldtop.[54]
§  Mick Jones (Foreigner) used a black Les Paul Custom retrofitted with DiMarzio Super Distortion humbuckers and 2 coil-tap switches. Gibson produces an "Inspired by" series of Jones' Les Paul.
§  Mick Jones (The Clash/Big Audio DynamiteCarbon/Silicon) used a Les Paul Junior, Les Paul Standard, several Les Paul Customs, and a Melody maker during his tenure with The Clash. He currently uses Les Paul Junior Double Cut.
§  Steve Jones (Sex Pistols) uses Les Paul Customs, Firebirds, Flying Vs, and a Gibson Les Paul Double Cut in his early days. Gibson produces an "Inspired by" series of Jones' Les Paul model.
§  Jorma Kaukonen, a self-described "Gibson nut,"[55] played an ES-345 or 355 for most of his career with Jefferson Airplane, and a J-45, a J-190[55] and an Advanced Jumbo[55] as a solo artist. He has also endorsed the Epiphoneequivalents.
§  Barney Kessel used an ES-350 and ES-350T. Gibson produced a "Barney Kessel" model in their Artist Model series in 1960.
§  Albert King was a left-handed "upside-down/backwards" guitarist: he usually played a Flying V flipped over upside-down so the low E string was on the bottom.[56]
§  B. B. King has used many different Gibson models, including an ES-5 and an ES-175 early in his career; later he began using thinline semi-acoustic models such as an ES-330, ES-335 and ES-345. King's Signature ES-355, nicknamed Lucille, has been his main guitar for many years.[57]
§  Freddie King used a Goldtop Les Paul with P-90 pickups. Also used an ES-355 in some live performances.[58]
§  Mark Knopfler Is known for playing a 1979 Gibson Les Paul Standard Reissue '59 on the Dire Straits song 'Money for nothing'. He also owns a 1985 Gibson Les Paul Standard Reissue '59, Sunburst. This customshop model has got his birthdate (12849) as the serialnumber.[59] He also plays other Gibson models like a 'super 400', an 'es 175' and a 'Chet Atkins'.[60]
§  Paul Kossoff (Free) "was a passionate Les Paul player able to say in a few notes what many dozens were attempting."[61] Kossoff used several late-50s Les Paul models as well as an ES-335 for occasional studio use.
§  Lenny Kravitz used a Flying V in his music video "Are You Gonna Go My Way". He also plays a sunburst Les Paul.
§  Robby Krieger (The Doors) uses an SG, an ES-335 and a Melody Maker. He also used a Black Gibson Les Paul for slide guitar in studio while with The Doors.
§  Andrew Latimer (Camel) uses a variety of Les Paul models, for instance Gibson Les Paul.[62]
§  Albert Lee owns a black 1958 Les Paul Custom given to him by Eric Clapton, a black 1958 J-200 given to him by Don Everly and an Everly Brothers model. Lee played the J-200 during the Concert For George. The guitars are usually kept under lock and key.
§  Alvin Lee (Ten Years After) used a customized ES-335 nicknamed "Big Red". The Gibson Custom shop now produces a reissue of Lee's guitar.
§  John Lennon used a J-160E while with The Beatles. Several of the songs on the White Album he composed in India on Donovan's J-45.[63] As a solo artist, Lennon used a Les Paul Special and a modified Les Paul Junior.[64][65]Gibson makes a limited-edition replica of his J-160E[66] and an "inspired by" John Lennon Les Paul replicating the modified Junior.[67]
§  Alex Lifeson (Rush) has used many different Gibson models over the course of his career including: a '68 sunburst ES-335, a '78 black / '77 sunburst ES-345, a '77 white ES-355, a '78 white / '76 cherry EDS-1275, a cherry SG, a sunburst Howard Roberts Fusion, an ES-369, a variety of Les Paul models, a Dove, and a J-45 acoustic. Gibson now has issued an "Inspired By series" of Lifeson's original white 355 as well as the Alex Lifeson Axxess Les Paul guitar.[68][69]
§  Lonnie Mack has used a 1958 Flying V fitted with a Bigsby vibrato tailpiece since the first year the Flying V was manufactured. He refers to it a "No. 7", as he was told that it was the seventh guitar off the production line. In the mid-1990s Gibson issued a limited-edition "Lonnie Mack" model of the guitar.
§  Ian MacKaye always played Gibson SG with Minor ThreatEmbrace and Fugazi.[70][71][72]
§  Frank Marino used a 1961 Les Paul throughout his entire career.[73]
§  Bob Marley (Bob Marley and The Wailers) used a Les Paul Special. The guitar is buried with him in his mausoleum. Gibson has released a Bob Marley Signature Les Paul Special.
§  Pat Martino uses a Pat Martino Signature model.[74] He formerly used an L5S.
§  Tak Matsumoto (B'z/solo) uses his own Les Paul signature model issued in 1999, which made him the first Asian artist to be bestowed with the honor. A number of other Gibson models comprise his collection,[75] including a number of custom-issued Gibson DC's designed solely for him.
§  Paul McCartney owns a rare left-handed 1957 Les Paul Goldtop[76] Like many players, McCartney has replaced the fragile original tuning machines with a more modern sturdy set.[77] He uses a left-handed 1960 Les Paul Standard (one of three known examples) as his main stage guitar.[78][79] He also uses a C-5 in the studio.
§  John McLaughlin has used many different Gibson models over the years, including Les Pauls, an EDS-1275, ES-335s, Byrdlands, a sunburst dual-pickup Johnny Smith model, an ES-345 and Hummingbird acoustics.He also used an SG on "****es Brew", Miles Davis' breakout fusion album from 1969.
§  Ralph McTell uses a J-45.
§  Pat Metheny uses a humbucker-equipped ES-175, both live and on many of his mainstream jazz recordings. Metheny has also used a Les Paul on occasion, notably on Zero Tolerance for Silence.
§  Bill Monroe, the "Father of Bluegrass," used a Lloyd Loar-signed Gibson scroll-top F5 Mandolin, making it the reference standard for bluegrass mandolinists. Monroe's F5 is now in the Country Music Hall of Fame.[80]
§  Wes Montgomery used an ES-175 early in his career as well as an L5 CES.[81] Gibson currently produces a Wes Montgomery Signature model L5 CES.
§  Gary Moore (Thin Lizzy/Skid Row/solo) used a Les Paul Standard and had two separate Les Paul signature models released by Gibson. Moore formerly owned the famous 1959 Les Paul used by Peter Green during his Fleetwood Mac tenure.[82] and had his own personal Les Paul model reconfigured to match the unusual modification of the Green original. He was also vocal about his fondness for the Explorer, which he used in his later solo career.
§  Scotty Moore (Elvis Presley's original lead guitarist) initially played an ES-295, before switching to an L5 CES and subsequently a Super 400 CES.[83] In 1999, Gibson reissued the ES-295 as the Scotty Moore Signature model.[84]
 

§  Jimmy Nolen (The J.B.'s) used various Gibson models.[85]
§  Ted Nugent is most closely associated with early 1960s Byrdland models in black, sunburst and natural, and Gibson has developed a Byrdland model named for him. More recently[when?], he has occasionally used a '59 sunburst Les Paul and an American-flag-motif Les Paul.[citation needed]
§  Mike Oldfield used an L6S around 1978, various Les Paul models and an SG Junior, which featured on many of his albums in the seventies and eighties.[86]
§  Roy Orbison used an ES-335 and a Les Paul with a Bigsby tailpiece.
§  Jimmy Page (The Yardbirds/Led Zeppelin/solo) uses a 1959 Les Paul ("Number 1", acquired from Joe Walsh), a 1959 Les Paul ("Number 2"[87]), a 1973 Les Paul, an EDS-1275, a 1977 RD Artist, an ES5 Switchmaster, a Goldtop Premium Les Paul and a 1991 Custom Shop Les Paul (built to be an exact replica of "Number 1" and re-nicknamed "Number 3"). Page also owned a modified 1960 Les Paul Custom "Black Beauty" with a Bigsby tailpiece and a 3-pickup configuration.[88] This guitar was stolen in 1970 and never recovered.[89] For acoustics Page used a Hummingbird, a J-200 and an A-2 mandolin. Gibson has released a Jimmy Page Signature model Les Paul replicating the features of "Number 2".[90][91][92] Page used an EDS-1275 double neck guitar during his live performances of Stairway to Heaven, The Rain Song and The Song Remains the Same.
§  Joe Pass used a sunburst ES-175;[93] Epiphone currently produces a Joe Pass signature Emperor model.[94]
§  Les Paul helped design the guitar named after him, and used a custom model.[95]
§  Joe Perry (Aerosmith) has used many Gibson models over the years, including ES-335s, Les Pauls, Flying Vs, and Firebirds; has signature Gibson[96] and Epiphone Les Paul models nicknamed "Boneyard".[97]
§  Carl Perkins - "the King of Rockabilly" - used, at various points in his career, a Les Paul Goldtop, an L5 and an SG.
§  Eddie Phillips (The Creation), used a Gibson ES-335, also with a violin bow in the mid 1960s.[98]
§  Andy Powell (Wishbone Ash) has used a Flying V throughout his entire career.
§  Elvis Presley appeared frequently in concert and films playing a 1956 J-200N, which he had inlaid with his name in 1960.[99]
§  John Prine uses a J-200.
§  Mick Ralphs (Bad Company/Mott the Hoople) used a Les Paul Junior, a Firebird and a Les Paul during his Mott the Hoople tenure; and a Les Paul Standard and a Flying V during his years with Bad Company. Ralphs currently uses Les Paul Custom Shop '58 & '59 Re-issue models.[citation needed]
§  Jimmy Raney used an ES-150 with "Charlie Christian" bar pickup for most of his career.[citation needed]
§  Randy Rhoads (Quiet Riot/Ozzy Osbourne) used an off-white Les Paul Custom.[citation needed]
§  Keith Richards (The Rolling Stones) has used a variety of Gibsons throughout his career; he's favoured Les Pauls and ES models, but has also occasionally been seen with assorted other models, including Firebirds, a Flying V, an SG, an L6S and a Melody Maker. In 1964 Richards got a 1959 sunburst Les Paul with a Bigsby tailpiece;[100] the guitar was the first "star-owned" Les Paul in Britain and served as one of Richards' main instruments through 1966.[19][101] He later sold the guitar to future Rolling Stones bandmate Mick Taylor.[102] In the mid-60s Richards acquired a 1953 Les Paul Goldtop[103] and the first of a series of 1957 Les Paul Customs.[104] One of the latter, hand-painted with psychedelic patterns, would be one of his main stage and studio guitars from 1968 through the end of the Rolling Stones' 1970 European tour.[105] Throughout the 1970s he continued to use various Gibson models on stage and in music videos. Among these were a second 1959 sunburst Les Paul, a 1954 Les Paul Custom "Black Beauty"[106] and a cherry red 1958 Les Paul Junior,[107] which he replaced in 1979 with a 1959 TV-yellow Les Paul Junior that he has used regularly on stage ever since. Since 1997 an ebony ES-355 has been among his favourite stage guitars, along with a white ES-345 that he unveiled in 2006.[108][109] In rehearsal and studio photos and footage he's frequently seen with an ES-350 and ES-175D.[110][111][112] Hummingbirds have been among his preferred acoustic models since 1965.
§  Lee Ritenour - noted for playing an L-5, a red ES-335, and his own signature Lee Ritenour Model archtop.
§  Howard Roberts - used several Gibson models over the course of his career including: an ES-175, an L-10[113] and a heavily modified ES-150 simply known as "The Black Guitar".[114] Gibson produces a Howard Roberts Fusion III signature model, which is a variation of an ES-165.
§  Brian Robertson (Thin Lizzy/Motörhead) has used a Les Paul throughout his entire career.[citation needed]
§  Rich Robinson (The Black Crowes) uses several different Gibson models, including a 1968 Les Paul Goldtop, a 1964 ES-335, a Customshop Flametop Les Paul, vintage SGs and double-cut Les Paul Specials, and a Dove.[115]
§  Mick Ronson (David Bowie) used a Les Paul Custom with the finish stripped for his guitar work on Ziggy Stardust and Aladdin Sane, among others.
§  Gary Rossington (Lynyrd Skynyrd) uses Les Pauls and SGs. Previously had a signature model Les Paul and SG released by Gibson.
§  Carlos Santana used an SG Special onstage at Woodstock and appeared in advertisements for the L-6S in the 1970s.[116] Santana has also used a sunburst Les Paul Custom.
§  Michael Schenker (Scorpions/UFO/Michael Schenker Group) used four different 1970s Flying V models. Number 1 was a modified 1975 model; Numbers 2 and 3 were 1979 block-inlay Flying Vs; and Number 4 was a mid-70s white Flying V. Numbers 1, 2 and 3 had Schenker's trademark "half black/half white" paint scheme.[citation needed]
§  Rudolf Schenker (Scorpions) uses various Flying V models dating from 1958-2001. He uses three 1958 original Flying Vs, three 1967-1969 Flying Vs, two 1971 Medallions (one was repainted black & white), a 1975 natural-finish Flying V, three 1983 replicas of the 1958 originals, four 1980 models and two 1984 Rudolf Schenker Signature models. Schenker has over 70 vintage and collectible Flying Vs along with several Custom Shop limited editions including a doubleneck Flying V.[117]
§  Tom Scholz (Boston) uses a 1968 Les Paul Goldtop with a DiMarzio SuperDistorion pickup in the bridge.
§  Neal Schon (Journey) uses a heavily modified Les Paul, including a Floyd Rose locking tremolo, custom electronics and sustainer unit. Gibson produces a signature model of Schon's guitar.
§  Earl Scruggs (one of the original Bill Monroe Blue Grass Boys) is noted for inventing a unique banjo style (now referred to as Scruggs style) that has become one of the defining characteristics ofbluegrass music. Scruggs' use of a flathead Gibson Mastertone Granada has made that model the standard for bluegrass players.[118] An inductee into both the Country Music Hall of Fame and the Bluegrass Hall of Honor, Gibson produces a signature model banjo, simply titled "The Earl", to honor Scruggs' monumental career achievements.[119]
§  Nikki Sixx (Mötley Crüe/Sixx A.M.) has used a number of Thunderbird basses throughout his career. Between 2000 and 2003 Gibson manufactured a Sixx signature bass, the 'Blackbird'.[120]
§  Slash (Guns N' Roses/Slash's Snakepit/Velvet Revolver/Slash's Blues Ball) uses many different Les Paul models including his own custom shop Les Paul model. He has also used an EDS-1275. In addition to his custom shop Les Paul, Gibson has manufactured two other Slash Les Pauls.[121]
§  Johnny Smith was a Gibson endorsee from 1961 to 1989, during which time Gibson sold the Johnny Smith model.[122] Smith switched to Heritage in 1989. Gibson continues to produce the design as the LeGrande.
§  Chris Spedding, a top British session guitarist of the 1970s is well known for playing a Flying V.
§  Bill Spooner (The Tubes) used a Flying V, an Explorer, a Les Paul, an SG and a 1959 Melody Maker.
§  Paul Stanley (Kiss) used a Flying V, an Explorer, a Firebird I, an SG, and an L6S.
§  Hubert Sumlin used a 1956 Les Paul Goldtop for many years and has used various Les Pauls and ES-335s.[123]
§  Mick Taylor (The Rolling Stones/solo) has used Les Pauls throughout his career, along with SGs, ES models and Firebirds. Taylor bought his first Les Paul from Selmer Musical Instruments in London. It was stolen in September 1967.[124] In 1967 for a replacement, he bought Keith Richards' Bigsby-equipped 1959 sunburst Les Paul, which he used on stage until 1971, first with John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers and then (from July 1969) with The Rolling Stones.[102] Taylor used other sunburst Les Pauls on the Rolling Stones' 1972-73 tours, and still frequently uses Les Pauls on stage.
§  Rosetta Tharpe was an early adopter of the Les Paul Gold-Top in 1956, and used a 1961 double-cutaway Les Paul Custom.
§  George Thorogood uses an ES-125.
§  Johnny Thunders used Les Paul Juniors.[125]
§  Pete Townshend (The Who/solo) used an SG Special from 1967–1972 and various customized Les Paul models from 1973–1979; he has also used an EDS-1275. Gibson produced a Townshend Signature model SG based on the guitar he played on at Woodstock in 1969. It was a limited edition and discontinued in 2003.[126] In 2006 the Gibson Custom Shop started production of three different Les Paul signature models[127] based on the guitars he played in the late 1970s. For acoustic work Townshend has consistently used SJ-200s.
§  Derek Trucks of the Allman Brothers Band and the Derek Trucks Band uses a modified Gibson USA SG '61 reissue with factory Vibrola, which has had the tailpiece modified and a stopbar tailpiece installed.[citation needed]
 

§  Eddie Van Halen has used a Les Paul, an ES-335 and a 1958 Flying V.[128]
§  T-Bone Walker electric blues guitar pioneer, used a Gibson ES-250,[129] ES-5, and ES-335.[130]
§  Joe Walsh (James Gang/Eagles) uses a Les Paul Standard and an EDS-1275. Walsh was known for "hot-wiring" the pickups on these guitars to create his trademark "attack" sound.[131]
§  Muddy Waters used a Les Paul Goldtop in his early career.[132]
§  Leslie West (Mountain) favoured a Les Paul Junior; demand for this model greatly increased after guitarists saw one in his hands,[133] and Gibson began to reissue the model in the mid 1970s. West also used an SG and a Flying V.
§  Snowy White uses a 1957 Les Paul Goldtop acquired in a trade for a Fender Stratocaster while in Sweden in 1968. White has been nicknamed "Gold Top" due to his long time use of the model.[134]
§  Carl Wilson (The Beach Boys) used an ES-335. Custom made in 1962, it has blonde finish and gold hardware with a Bigsby B-7 tremolo. In 1983 the original guitar neck was broken and replaced with a neck from an ES-355.
§  Johnny Winter - uses a Firebird, along with Les Pauls, SGs and Flying Vs.
§  Ronnie Wood (Faces/The Rolling Stones) regularly uses Firebirds, Les Pauls and a J-200 acoustic on stage;[109][135] he also owns a custom-built single-pickup L5S,[136] a Super 400 CES and an L5.[112] In the late 1970s Wood endorsed the S-1 guitar.[136] In 1997 Gibson announced three Ron Wood signature models: a J-200, a Firebird and a Dobro.[137]
§  Zakk Wylde (Ozzy Osbourne/Pride and Glory/Black Label Society) uses a signature Les Paul "Bulls Eye" model, a signature Les Paul "Buzzsaw" model and signature "Camo" model with a camouflage finish. He is seen using a black EDS-1275 in the promotional video for In This River. Lately he has been using a custom SG/Flying V hybrid "Bulls Eye" model called the "ZV" for live Ozzy Osbourne shows. Wylde also has a new Custom Shop Flying V "Bulls Eye" that is currently in production complete with a Floyd Rose tremolo. His most recent signature, the "Zakk Wylde BFG" Les Paul is essentially a stripped down version of his custom bullseye Les Pauls, available in bullseye and buzzsaw finishes. He also has a coffin shaped signature guitar produced by Epiphone called the "Graveyard Disciple" it is equipped with a Floyd Rose tremolo.
§  Angus Young (AC/DC) uses an SG.[138] Gibson has produced an Angus Young Signature SG model.[139]
§  Neil Young uses several Gibson acoustic and electric models. Young's main guitar, "Old Black", is a 1953 Goldtop Les Paul (painted black) with a mini-humbucker from a Firebird in the bridge position and a Bigsby tailpiece. Young also has two other 1953 Goldtops, one which has modifications similar to "Old Black", the other a stock original. Also uses a J-200 and a Mastertone GB-3 banjo; on the Time Fades Away tour he used a 1958 Flying V.[140] 
Frank Zappa used a 1953/54 Les Paul Goldtop, an SG, a late 70s Les Paul Custom and an ES-5 Switchmaster. An ES-355 was his main guitar on the 1970 tour. Zappa usually heavily modified his guitars to include preamps, balanced outputs for studio work, and later, Fernandes sustainers.[141] 
 

post edited by offnote - 2012/09/02 03:12:34
#35
offnote
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 02:44:54 (permalink)
and one more thing, Jimi Hendrix once told me he played fender only because couldn't afford the gibson.
Later on he played he got gibson as well.
#36
zungle
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 02:47:36 (permalink)

BTW your list is quite short, here you have Gibson players...



Well done.................


I didn't take the time to actually search ..................


I just threw out a few names of guys I know of that played strats........
post edited by zungle - 2012/09/02 02:53:31
#37
zungle
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 02:55:10 (permalink)
and one more thing, Jimi Hendrix once told me he played fender only because couldn't afford the gibson. Later on he played he got gibson as well.


Yeah,

And the rest is history.......................right?
#38
sharke
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 02:56:58 (permalink)
A list of famous Gibson players, without Frank Zappa. 
#39
offnote
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 03:11:38 (permalink)
sharke


A list of famous Gibson players, without Frank Zappa. 

You're right, sorry he was cut off when I copied that list from wiki - he was definitely there.
I have updated list already :)
#40
Linear Phase
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 04:04:02 (permalink)
I use a Carvin..  Built in California.. ( Which those of us who do not live in Los Angeles still consider the USA. )  It has a neck through body, with locking tuners, tune o matic bridge....

Fenders are rarely made in the USA.  

too many lasers...






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#41
craigb
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 05:09:42 (permalink)
zungle


Here's a few great Strat players from the 60's/ 70's/80's..................

Its a real shame they didn't go all out Gibson............

They may have been famous.............


Hendrix
Blackmore
Bolin,
Walsh
Gilmour 
Malmsteen
Beck
Blew
Knopler
Mayer
Oldfield
J.Young
Lifeson
Trower..............personal favorite.
SRV

Don't get me wrong I know there were alot of Gibson guys in that era(playing Norlins )

But a few guys on my list had at least small success on their thin sounding guitars.

Leave out one "e" and it's just not the same!  And, to be fair, if you actually found a list like the Gibson one, you'd have about as many names.  I can think of several off the top of my head that are missing (including Eric Johnson and Walter Trout).
 
The thing about almost all of the really good players out there is that they tended to have at least a few of both as well as customs and other brands.  Not sure where this topic is going actually other than to say what I said before:  Gibson has become overpriced and has lowered their quality significantly.  A few years ago I went to GC to get another Les Paul (Standard or Classic).  I tried out 22 different guitars and many had quality defects, most felt, played and/or sounded different from each other and only two out of that whole bunch were ones that I felt I might want to play and play (and only these two felt like my own older Gibsons).  I ended up buying an older Classic from a private party that was wonderful until I started getting customs built for me.
 
For electrics (non-basses), I've only owned one Fender guitar (a really nice Lone Star Strat with removable pickguards, one as S/S/S and the other as S/S/H).  I've had four or five Gibsons, a few Ibanezes, two Epiphones (one, a Korina Flying V), a couple of Schecters, a Steinberger (L-Series), two Peaveys (a T-60 & a Wolfgang), a Rondo (POS LP copy - my first guitar), a Chris Folke custom lap-steel, a couple of Music Man Axis' (loved 'em) and a Line 6 Variax (whose guts are still in one of my Jeff Miller customs). 
 
At one time or another I've played Hamers, Kramers (including the one with the alloy neck that weighed more than the body!), a Vandenberg, PRS', a Parker Fly, a Rickenbacher, BC Rich, Yamahas (the Pacifics as Beep would probably agree are highly underated for their price) and Carvins (I used to work close enough to their factory to go there during lunchtime to play - never cared for the necks or I would have bought a few!). 
 
Other than some GC curiousity, I've never played any of the ES-335 varieties, a Gresch, a Tom Anderson, a Danelectro, any resonator or dobro, a Gordon-Smith, a JET, a QuickSilver, a Charvel or - believe it or not - I've never played a Telecaster!  I always avoided them for the stupidest reason possible:  I thought they were butt fugly.  LOL!
 
The bottom line: Most people don't buy ONLY Gibson or Fender.

 Craig B. (AKA Mishikakiji!  )  
#42
joakes
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 07:32:51 (permalink)
One day i'll buy a Gibson.

But for the moment, i certainly agree with Craigb's last line. My go to guitar is a Stagg L400 (which has the straightest neck i've ever come across) that's been modified with SD Phat Cats and a Bigsby. It sounds  really fat now but the b-minor is it weighs a ton.

I also have a Fender American HH, but whilst its good, the action and the sound are not quite the same as the Stagg.

Cheers,
Jerry

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#43
Rodar6
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 07:55:44 (permalink)
I thought about buying a proper guitar for the last few years and when I mean proper I mean Fender or Gibson. It takes a lot of saving for one of these in the UK as they are more expensive compared to USA prices.

In the end I bought a secondhand 52 Reissue Fender Tele because I could afford it at £1000. After playing it for 6 months I'm beginning to think that I should have kept saving for a bit longer and bought a Gibson Les Paul. However I find that even their Standard Les Pauls of late are a bit disappointing : ( especially at £2000.

I've been dreaming a bit recently and thought about getting a 58 for £2700 or a 59 for £4000. A 59 would definitely put an end to thinking about other guitars. Guitar monogamy sounds bliss but comes at a hefty price : )



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#44
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 08:13:10 (permalink)
As stated in another thread, don't discount trying an Agile guitar.  VERY much like an Les Paul and everyone I know of that have bought one have been extremely and pleasantly surprised.  Checkout Rondo Guitars for Agiles

Another one to try is a Tokai.  I know the guy who distributes these from So. Africa.  Check those out HERE.

Again, Yamaha Pacificas and some of the Schecters are also great values for the money.

 Craig B. (AKA Mishikakiji!  )  
#45
Danny Danzi
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 08:56:35 (permalink)
offnote


Beepster


Clapton is poor example. His playing is kind of "thin" as it is... and I dare you to try and get a nice SRV tone out of a Gibson. It just ain't gonna happen.

I don't agree, but here you go Thin Lizzy, try get such great sound out of the fender - it aint' gonna happen...
listen to the solo at 56s
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9fG8TCHccIU

I too would agree that Clapton is a poor example. If anything, I sincerely feel his more commercial/newer stuff is way thicker than it was in the old days. I like his tone, playing and writing more now than when he was young and carefree.
 
As for the Thin Lizzy tone, it's not the guitar as much as it is the pups and mic placement. Give me a strat with humbuckers and I'll nail that tone. To me, you get way more tone options with a strat. Add a humbucker and keep a coil tap switch in it to go to single coil and you have the best of all worlds along with the 5 position toggle switch. To me, that smokes all the Gibson's I own...and I have quite a few.
 
Fender put out a guitar in the 80's that I was so crazy about, I bought 3 of them. To me, the best strat ever made simply called "Strat" otherwise known as "The HM Strat" with 24 frets, a humbucker and a coil tap toggle switch.
 
At the end of the day, it's going to be a personal preference thing. For me in how I play now as well as what I play, neither Fender or Gibson has anything to offer me that compare to my custom Carvin DC-400's. I can get just about any tone known to man out of them. Active pups and passive pups all in one package via push/pull volume knob. Full single coil tap switch, phase switch for the tele type sound...it's a sick guitar.
 
That said, I'd never blame a guitar for the rise or decline of music. Blame the industry for what it accepts and the choices made by artists. No matter what guitar I play, I sound like me. People either like my style or they hate it...the guitar matters not other than my personal preference or the idea I'm trying to convey which dictates which one I'd use.
 
Gibson and Fender both have their place in my world. However, their prices are so insane, neither are worth anything to me other than the old ones I have that I've kept for investment purposes. But to play them...I'd rather play a Carvin or an Ibanez.
 
That said, I do have one Gibson that sticks out sound wise over any other I own. I call it the 8th wonder of the world. A custom shop all lucite Les Paul Custom. At 22 lbs it's a bear to play, but the sound and feel is unlike any other Paul I own or have played. I just wish it wasn't so heavy as you can barely play it sitting down...but man does it sound fantastic!
 
-Danny
post edited by Danny Danzi - 2012/09/02 08:57:48
#46
spacealf
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 10:15:54 (permalink)
You want others to read all of this. Some of it emotional, and some for discussion of opinion points. Where's the music?

 
 
#47
Rain
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 10:29:26 (permalink)
Because they're so fricking expensive, among other things.

But when I grew up as a teenager back in the 80s, the classics weren't really cool anymore. I had a Les Paul copy which was probably one of the most uncool guitars, right before telecasters and those hold hollowbody guitars.. 

I remember watching Iron Maiden's Live After Death w/ an older friend who just couldn't believe it when he saw Adrian Smith put down his awesome Lado to play that butt-ugly old piece of junk Les Paul Goldtop on certain numbers... lol 

Fender strats weren't the coolest guitars either, but they were acceptable, because w/ the addition of a humbucker or two and a Kahler or Floyd Rose, they held their ground against Kramer, Charvel, BC Rich and other super strats.

I've played strats for the biggest part of my life - the minute I could afford replacing that old Les Paul copy, and eventually could put my hands on an american one.

Would I buy a genuine Gibson Les Paul? If I were swimming in cash, maybe. But I think the prices are obscene. Paying $1000 for my american strat was justifiable to an extent. But 3 or 4 times as much? No way. 

As for tone, I like both. Most of my favorite players played strats - Gilmour, Bolin, Hendrix, Blackmore, SRV, etc. My favorite Gibson guy overall has got to be Jimmy Page - but in the studio, he used a variety of guitars and amps coupled w/ clever mic techniques to sculp his tones. The Les Paul is a live thing for him.

I also liked Randy Rhoads a lot - he's the reason I started playing electric guitar - but I can't honestly say much in favor of his tone.

I've recently switched back to Les Paul (Epiphone) as my main guitar. My playing isn't as swift and fluid on the LP but I'm not really into that type of playing and sound these days. The LP gives me something ballsier - they're just so loud...

But then again, thinking of EVH's tone on that first album, we can't really say that strat models necessarily sound "thin". 

Into the Crypt...
#48
BIABDude
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 10:37:06 (permalink)
offnote


and one more thing, Jimi Hendrix once told me he played fender only because couldn't afford the gibson.
Later on he played he got gibson as well.
You talked -knew the one and only Hendrix +++1

#49
jhughs
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 11:05:57 (permalink)
My vote goes for using the right tool for the job.
In my youth, I went with a Strat partly because of the cover of the Jeff Beck "Wired" album... and yes, I already had "Blow by Blow" and knew several types of guitars were being used.  (So where does this "Fenders make inferior music" concept come from?)

My neighbor said he grew up a Jimmy Page fan so he went with Gibson, but of course....


 



and then of course my favorite that's neither Gibson nor Fender, the Silvertone:






post edited by jhughs - 2012/09/02 11:11:04

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#50
MakeShift
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 11:36:59 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby chefmike8888 2013/11/26 21:43:44
To me, the defining sound of a Gibson is rounder, warmer, thicker, fatter and more mellow.  The defining sound of a Fender is snappier, brighter, clearer and not as fat, more present is a better discription.  Most of this difference comes from the scale length, pick ups, and solid neck through or bolt on neck.

Mike

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#51
bapu
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 11:37:49 (permalink) ☄ Helpfulby chefmike8888 2013/11/26 21:43:55
Just buy an Alembic and be done with it.
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zungle
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 11:51:18 (permalink)
The bottom line: Most people don't buy ONLY Gibson or Fender.



Thats the plain truth.........
#53
Rain
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 12:07:05 (permalink)
We can come w/ all the arguments in the world - one of the biggest reasons why strats outsells other guitars (beside the price) is this man.





Me - the first "real" guitar (as opposed to my LP copy) I put my hands on was a '57 strat - black, white pick guard, maple neck. Belonged to a friend's dad, who also owned a limited run flying v, a bunch of telecasters, strats, and even a pedal steel. I loved spending time at their place - there were guitars everywhere!


Then I saw that vid, and it pretty much convinced me that that was the guitar for me.








I was so happy when I finally got it that I couldn't stop smiling, even when we were playing the darkest material. ;)



post edited by Rain - 2012/09/02 12:20:16

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Rain
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 12:24:44 (permalink)
zungle



The bottom line: Most people don't buy ONLY Gibson or Fender.



Thats the plain truth.........

+1


If there's one brand that seems to come up more often than either these days, I was under the impression that the younger generation was more into Ibanez.


The alternative/hipster scene also seem to have contributed to a Telecaster craze. Back in my days, these were basically only good for old farts playing country or Keith Richards. ;)

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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 12:39:31 (permalink)
These days it's hard to see why anyone would want to own either brand...they've both become degraded and devalued.  But, like I've said before...Ol Henry J. Is no dummy...a money grubbin SOB, sure...but no dummy.

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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 12:55:18 (permalink)
What's this about the price of Gibson guitars. Seems like Fender with the Custom Shop charge just as much. http://www.sweetwater.com...QiOiI0Mjk0OTY3MjEzIn19 Save the wood, I guess.

 
 
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 12:59:44 (permalink)
And yes it has changed from the $425 ES-345 bought back in the '60's but then I got $1200 for it 25 years ago when I had to sell it, and then the dealer at the antique guitar show turned around and sold it for $1500 in about 15 minutes. I had forgotten the stereo cord but sent it to the new owner afterwards. He wanted a clean guitar and it was a clean guitar.
post edited by spacealf - 2012/09/02 13:01:02

 
 
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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 13:44:08 (permalink)
humbucker
MakeShift


To me, the defining sound of a Gibson is rounder, warmer, thicker, fatter and more mellow.  The defining sound of a Fender is snappier, brighter, clearer and not as fat, more present is a better discription.  Most of this difference comes from the scale length, pick ups, and solid neck through or bolt on neck.

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Re:why gibson is less popular then fender these days? 2012/09/02 13:46:43 (permalink)
Over the years, I have noticed the same thing Spacealf, Gibson's hold there value pretty well.  Same has been true for the Rickenbacher's and Martin's that I have bought and sold.  I had a Fender American Deluxe Strat that I sold once, where I had changed out the neck with a custom shop Fender neck and the buyer complained that it was no longer original.  Here I thought that was the beauty of a bolt on neck, you could replace it with a new and maybe even better one, if you wanted.

I have noticed a resurgence in ES335's over the last couple of years.  I have also noticed several blues players, Bossanama (sp), Jonny Lang and even Clapton playing Paul's again. 

One thing that I have done over the years as turn a good Epi into a player by changing out the pickups with Gibson Classic 57's or the likes.  You can come awfully close to the real thing with a good pick up change.  For me, it is still about the playability of the neck on guitars.  It's which guitar, even in the same line, feels best in your hands.

Mike

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